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Downpour helps buoy Lake Lanier

Downpour helps buoy Lake Lanier

GAINESVILLE, Ga. -- The soggy Mother's Day weather may have been bad news to moms across the state, but it was good news for north Georgia's Lake Lanier.

The wet weather helped push the lake's level to almost 1,065 feet - just six feet below full pool level.

More rain and a possibly a thunderstorm or two are on the way. The wet front could bring heavy rain and shows that could linger into Wednesday night.

Hall Co. to use propane-powered school buses

Hall Co. to use propane-powered school buses

HALL COUNTY, Ga. -- The Hall County school system is adding 20 buses powered by liquefied petroleum gas, or propane.

The vehicles are scheduled to hit the streets by early May, making Hall County one of the first school systems in the South to use propane-fueled buses.

Officials say they expect the buses to save money on fuel costs.

Jewel Armour, executive director of operations for Hall County Schools, says the system now pays around $3.50 per gallon for diesel fuel, including delivery fees and taxes. With propane, the total cost is expected to be about $2 per gallon or less.

Register for Appliance Pick-up Week

Register for Appliance Pick-up Week

 

Hall County residents will have a chance to get rid of large household appliances during the annual Appliance Pick-up Week. Residents must register Feb. 20 - March 2 and will be assigned a date for curbside pick-up. 

Appliances accepted include stoves/ranges, refrigerators/freezers, washers/dryers, water heaters, dish washers. There is a limit of three items per household. 

Call Monday - Friday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 20 - March 2 to register:

* Unincorporated Hall County residents: 770-531-1102

* Gainesville city limits residents: 770-532-0493

* Oakwood city limits residents: 770-534-2365

* Flowery Branch city limits residents: 770-967-6371

Army Corps limits water flow from Lake Lanier

Army Corps limits water flow from Lake Lanier

ATLANTA -- The flow of water from a reservoir that serves much of Metro Atlanta will be restricted as a conservation step during an ongoing drought.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Wednesday that it will cut the flow of water from the dam at Lake Lanier from 750 cubic feet per second to 650 cubic feet per second. Army Corps spokesman Pat Robbins said the goal is to save water in case the drought gets worse.

If more water is available in Lake Lanier, more can be released later on to supplement river systems.

Georgia officials asked for the conservation step earlier this month.

Army officials said they evaluated information from Georgia authorities and determined that decreasing the flow of water into the Chattahoochee River will not harm the environment.

Hall County is making it easier for residents to recycle

Hall County is making it easier for residents to recycle

Hall County is making it easier for residents to recycle by offering more options and less sorting at the county's 12 compactor sites starting Nov. 5. Mixed paper and mixed cardboard are now accepted at all sites.

Honoring Mother Nature

Honoring Mother Nature

 

Do you believe fish eat trash?  Does life come from water?  Kids think so.

You can come experience a glimpse of Mother Nature’s glory through the eyes of grade school children at the ‘River of Words’ exhibit in the Spouts Springs Library.  Clever award winning kids have created art and poetry that is sure to pique your interest about what is happening in Georgia’s waters. 

Mary Poland, Director of the library said, “Any student who is interested in caring for the environment, particularly the waters should come see this.” 

There’s the ‘Trash fish’ and the ‘Life comes from water’ paintings.  The ‘River of words’ exhibit is an arts and environmental education program.  Hurry though, it will only be at the library until Sept.

Drought spreads into North Georgia

Drought spreads into North Georgia

ATLANTA -- Georgia's state climatologist says extreme drought conditions have now spread into North Georgia and cover most of the state south of the mountains.

Climatologist David Stooksbury says all of Georgia's counties are now classified as being in moderate, severe or extreme drought.

In his most recent reports on the drought, Stooksbury said the outlook for relief in the short-term is not promising. Unless Georgia sees some tropical weather over the next few months, the state can expect below-normal rainfall and above-normal temperatures.

Without tropical rain, Georgia's soil is expected to continue to dry out. Stream flows, groundwater levels and reservoir levels are expected to continue to drop, and wildfire potentials are expected to remain high to extreme.